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Other / When Do We Reach the Tipping Point?

Try to connect leadership styles and what you have learned about effective leadership in your response.

Within the field of human services, there are programs and staff at programs that are perceived to have become complacent; accepting a “broken” system that seems to be part of the barriers/challenges related to programs reaching their very mission.
1. If the tipping point theory is correct, why are there not more leaders within the field emerging with the ability to lead transformational shifts in service delivery that would better serve program participants and fix a “broken” system?
Considerations: Are there other internal and external barriers to the change that prevents leaders from creating the large group following and support they need to bring about change? How does a leader work through those barriers?
Try to connect leadership styles and what you have learned about effective leadership in your response.

An example of internal resistance could be other staff within the program or field that are not willing to get behind a new idea. When leaders introduce new evidence-based models of service that are working well in other regions but are not currently being used in our programs/community, the conversation often starts with how to create buy-in. Although research indicates that a new model is more effective, that new model can only be successful if those that would be using a new model believe in it. Using the example of the First Follower video, if no one other than the first person were to dance, there would have been no movement.
An example of external resistance could be NIMBYism (not in my backyard) or funding sources that prevent change.
text:
Brody, R.& Nair, M. (2014). Effectively Managing and Leading Human Service Organizations. Thousand
Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.